Annals of Movement Disorders

ORIGINAL ARTICLE
Year
: 2022  |  Volume : 5  |  Issue : 3  |  Page : 178--182

“Super” high-frequency subthalamic stimulation for managing refractory dyskinesia in Parkinson’s disease


Chayut Kasemsuk1, Genko Oyama2, Fuyuko Sasaki4, Satoko Sekimoto4, Maierdanjiang Nuermaimaiti4, Hirokazu Iwamuro3, Atsushi Umemura3, Nobutaka Hattori2 
1 Department of Neurology, Prasat Neurological Institute, Bangkok, Thailand; Department of Neurology, Juntendo University School of Medicine, Bunkyo City, Tokyo
2 Department of Neurology, Juntendo University School of Medicine, Bunkyo City, Tokyo; Department of Neurodegenerative and Demented Disorders, Juntendo University Graduate School of Medicine, Tokyo, Japan; Home Medical Care System, based on Information and Communication Technology, Juntendo University Graduate School of Medicine, Tokyo, Japan; Drug Development for Parkinson’s Disease, Juntendo University Graduate School of Medicine, Tokyo, Japan; PRO-Based Integrated Data Analysis in Neurological Disorders, Juntendo University Graduate School of Medicine, Tokyo, Japan; Research and Therapeutics for Movement Disorders, Juntendo University Graduate School of Medicine, Tokyo, Japan
3 Department of Neurosurgery, Juntendo University School of Medicine, Bunkyo City, Tokyo; Research and Therapeutics for Movement Disorders, Juntendo University Graduate School of Medicine, Tokyo, Japan

Correspondence Address:
Genko Oyama
Department of Neurology, Juntendo University School of Medicine, 2-1-1 Hongo, Bunkyo-ku, Tokyo, 113–8421
Japan

Objective: To evaluate and compare the effect of “super” high-frequency (SHF; >130 Hz) stimulation and conventional high-frequency (CHF; 100–130 Hz) stimulation on patients with dyskinesia. Methods: The patients were evaluated using the Abnormal Involuntary Movement Scale (AIMS) with SHF and CHF after levodopa infusion. The secondary outcomes included the Burke–Fahn–Marsden dystonia rating scale and the Unified Parkinson’s Disease Rating Scale part III scores. Result: Six patients were enrolled in this study. The AIMS scores were not significantly different between SHF and CHF (p=0.89, paired t-test). Three out of six patients (50%) had better AIMS scores when SHF was applied, the scores of two patients remained unchanged, and one patient had a score worse than that with CHF. No short-term adverse effects were observed. Conclusion: The results of our pilot study show that SHF is safe and tolerable. We believe that in appropriate cases SHF can be used for managing dyskinesia after conventional methods yield unfavorable results.


How to cite this article:
Kasemsuk C, Oyama G, Sasaki F, Sekimoto S, Nuermaimaiti M, Iwamuro H, Umemura A, Hattori N. “Super” high-frequency subthalamic stimulation for managing refractory dyskinesia in Parkinson’s disease.Ann Mov Disord 2022;5:178-182


How to cite this URL:
Kasemsuk C, Oyama G, Sasaki F, Sekimoto S, Nuermaimaiti M, Iwamuro H, Umemura A, Hattori N. “Super” high-frequency subthalamic stimulation for managing refractory dyskinesia in Parkinson’s disease. Ann Mov Disord [serial online] 2022 [cited 2023 Feb 1 ];5:178-182
Available from: https://www.aomd.in/article.asp?issn=2590-3446;year=2022;volume=5;issue=3;spage=178;epage=182;aulast=Kasemsuk;type=0